kemp1991:

One of my coworkers shared this picture on Facebook.

This picture says so much.

kemp1991:

One of my coworkers shared this picture on Facebook.

This picture says so much.

(Reblogged from for-some-heroes)

naloxonebiteparamedic:

emt-monster:

A transplanted heart does not respond to atropine

This is because atropine affects the vagus nerve (parasympathetic innervation of the heart), not the heart itself.

Since a transplanted heart is not connected to the recipient’s nerves, atropine will have limited or no effect on the donor heart. Neither will vagal stimulation like Valsalva maneuvre or carotid massage

Eventually however, there may be some regeneration of nervous innervation to the new heart; mostly sympathetic, but also parasympathetic nerves. In that case, atropine might work.

But the treatment of choice in hemodynamically significant bradycardia in heart recipients, is pacing (according to ACLS guidelines).

Found this hanging around on my wall, check it out guys.

(Reblogged from nursingisinmyblood)
cryptfly:

asperqueer:

asksecularwitch:

greatmoustachesploosh:

foxinu:

nsfwjynx:

the-pink-mist:

There was a split second there where his like, “wait, what? bro what are you doing?” 
On more serious note, PTSD dogs for veterans are so fucking therapeutic. They’re like the one person you can spill your guts to and never worry about ever being judged or have that secret divulged. There are times when I definitely prefer the company of a dog over a human. 

Therapy animals save lives.

These dogs are even still so much more amazing. They check rooms before their handler enters, so they can clear it to help the person feel safe. Like in the gif, they are there when panic attacks or nightmares occur, to be something for the person to help ground themselves on, or yes just to turn on the lights. Even more amazing, many people are able to reduce their medication when they have a PTSD service dog there to help them. These dogs are useful for not just veterans, but also victims of abuse, accident trauma, natural disasters, and others. Their training allows them to be useful in situations where medical assistance is needed, as well. Some PTSD dogs are trained to recognize repetitive behaviours in handlers, and signal the handler to break the repetition and stopping the behaviour and possibly injury. 
Service dogs in general are just awesome. Remember to respect any that you see out in public. They are not there for you to walk up to and play with, even the puppies!

I was reading an article of a service dog helping a person with schizophrenia. she stated that when she was seeing or hearing things and notices the dog is not reacting in any way, then she is able to ground herself, realizing what she was experiencing was not real and could work through it easier and is more able to ignore the delusions. And she pointed out she feels more comfortable with a service dog as well because well, dogs don’t judge and get angry for things like this

I teared up about this whole post to be honest.

i’ll never not reblog this post. it is so important.

I cried a little about this

cryptfly:

asperqueer:

asksecularwitch:

greatmoustachesploosh:

foxinu:

nsfwjynx:

the-pink-mist:

There was a split second there where his like, “wait, what? bro what are you doing?” 

On more serious note, PTSD dogs for veterans are so fucking therapeutic. They’re like the one person you can spill your guts to and never worry about ever being judged or have that secret divulged. There are times when I definitely prefer the company of a dog over a human. 

Therapy animals save lives.

These dogs are even still so much more amazing. They check rooms before their handler enters, so they can clear it to help the person feel safe. Like in the gif, they are there when panic attacks or nightmares occur, to be something for the person to help ground themselves on, or yes just to turn on the lights. Even more amazing, many people are able to reduce their medication when they have a PTSD service dog there to help them. These dogs are useful for not just veterans, but also victims of abuse, accident trauma, natural disasters, and others. Their training allows them to be useful in situations where medical assistance is needed, as well. Some PTSD dogs are trained to recognize repetitive behaviours in handlers, and signal the handler to break the repetition and stopping the behaviour and possibly injury. 

Service dogs in general are just awesome. Remember to respect any that you see out in public. They are not there for you to walk up to and play with, even the puppies!

I was reading an article of a service dog helping a person with schizophrenia. she stated that when she was seeing or hearing things and notices the dog is not reacting in any way, then she is able to ground herself, realizing what she was experiencing was not real and could work through it easier and is more able to ignore the delusions. And she pointed out she feels more comfortable with a service dog as well because well, dogs don’t judge and get angry for things like this

I teared up about this whole post to be honest.

i’ll never not reblog this post. it is so important.

I cried a little about this

(Source: 4gifs)

(Reblogged from justagirlfromarkansas)

jockeyfever:

These people get paid to save lives.

(Reblogged from emsnfire4life)

code-three:

For the record, pediatric calls scare me and sometimes shake me to my core. The other day I stayed cool and calm despite my pedi pt in the car accident that was deteriorating and I’m really proud of myself for that because 6 months ago I would have been a trembling mess on the verge of nerve puking.

(Reblogged from code--three-deactivated20140730)

emt-monster:

FACIAL FRACTURES

Le Fort I fractures may result from a blow to the upper jaw in a downward direction. It is also known as a floating palate’. The fracture extends from the nasal septum and extends horizontally above the teeth in the upper jaw.
Symptoms: (in common with Le Fort III) Slight swelling of the upper lip, bruising in the cheek fold, teeth don’t fit together, mobility of teeth/upper jaw. Fractures may be almost immobile and it is only by grasping the maxillary teeth and applying a little firm pressure that a characteristic grate can be felt which is diagnostic of the fracture (Better leave this to the ER-doctor) 

Le Fort II fractures may result from a blow to the lower or mid maxilla (upper jaw). It extends from the nasal bridge through the bottom of the eye socket and then down towards the rear of the upper jaw.
SymptomsLefort II and Lefort III (common) swelling of soft tissue over the middle third of the face, bruising around eyes (racoon eyes), bleeding in the white of the eyes, nosebleed, leaking cerebrospinal fluid from nose, mobile upper jaw, “dish face” deformity (flattened face, see picture above), and double vision. 

Le Fort III fractures start at the nasal bridge, goes through the eye socket, the outer eye rim and the cheek bone. This type of fracture predisposes the patient to CSF leaking more commonly than the other types.
Symptoms: Lengthening of face, sunken-in eyes, charachteristic flattened face (see picture).

Examination

Examination

(Reblogged from your-future-nurse)

When people who are or are studying to be EMS personnel post pictures revealing the identity of a patient… dead or alive

(Reblogged from tilting-planet)
(Reblogged from for-some-heroes)

To all the EMS/Fire/Medical blogs here on tumblr

theunknownprovider:

dreamingems:

I definitely would love following some more blogs, so like/reblog/follow/ or send me a message and I will check you out! (Well your blog) (maybe you too who knows)
* EMT blogs
* EMR blogs
* Paramedic blogs
* Doctor Blogs
* Nurse blogs
* Firefighter blogs
This blog ( dreamingems ) is dedicated to the medical and firefighting fields.

Thanks for the follow, followed ya back!

(Reblogged from life-of-a-medic-student)

inked-emt:

hooligans-with-halligans:

sixpenceee:

Ok but look at my really cool needle shaped pen

i need these for my ems pants. patients would freak.

i have this pen in my ems pants… it indeed does freak patients out

(Reblogged from tofeelthefireinside)